July 27, 2015

What's on TV? Sunday, July 29, 1962

Back home again in Indiana this week, with stops in Champaign, Fort Wayne, Terre Haute, Muncie and Lafayette augmenting the main listings from Indianapolis.  One thing I noticed is that many of the programs that pop up on public TV in Minneapolis-St. Paul during these days are seen on commercial TV in this issue, since at this point there aren't any public stations in the viewing area.  You'll see more of what I mean as we get into it.




WCIA, Channel 3 (Champaign) (CBS)

Morning


08:55a
Inspiration Time

09:00a
Lamp Unto My Feet

09:30a
Look Up and Live

10:00a
Camera Three

10:30a
Christopher Program

11:00a
Navy Film

11:30a
Washington Conversation (guest Sen. Karl Mundt)

11:55a
CBS News (Dave Dugan)

Afternoon


12:00p
Cartoon Carnival

12:45p
Baseball (White Sox vs Yankees)

04:00p
The Big Picture (Army)

04:30p
Original Amateur Hour

05:00p
The Twentieth Century

05:30p
Mister Ed

Evening


06:00p
Lassie

06:30p
Dennis the Menace

07:00p
Ed Sullivan (guests Kate Smith, Wayne and Shuster, Robert Goulet, Jackie Wilson, Marquis Chimps, Rob Murray, Lon Purdy)

08:00p
G.E. Theater

08:30p
Who in the World?

09:00p
Candid Camera

09:30p
What’s My Line? (panelists Joey Bishop, Arlene Francis, Dorothy Kilgallen, Bennett Cerf)

10:00p
The Third Man

10:30p
News, Weather, Sports (local)

11:00p
Movie – “The Road to Utopia”

One thing you'll definitely notice as you go through the listings is that the programs on Channel 3 and, later on, Channel 10 are one hour later on other stations in the area.  In Channel 3's case it's fairly obvious - Champaign, being in Illinois, is on Central time whereas the rest of the cities are on Eastern time.  As far as Channel 10, which is in Terre Haute - I'm not sure.  I do know that up until a few years ago, Indiana (or at least parts of it) didn't recognize Daylight Savings Time, so that could be it.  If you have a better idea, just let me know!


WTTV, Channel 4 (Ind.)

Afternoon


12:00p
Oral Roberts

12:30p
Movie – “Song of the Saddle”

01:30p
The People’s Choice

02:00p
Movie – “Two Tickets to Broadway”

04:00p
The Islanders

05:00p
Global Zone

05:30p
Baptist Temple

Evening


06:00p
Sea Hunt

06:30p
State Trooper

07:00p
Cannonball

07:30p
Bishop Sheen

08:00p
Movie – “The Great Gilbert and Sullivan”

10:00p
Indiana University

10:30p
The People’s Choice

11:00p
News in Perspective

You'll see the program Indiana University on stations all over the place today.  I imagine it's some kind of extension program, or perhaps a weekly discussion of issues, which would make sense being that it's shown on Sunday.  Otherwise, a pretty standard lineup for an independent station.


WFBM, Channel 6 (NBC)

Morning


07:00a
Indiana University

07:30a
This is the Answer

08:00a
Sunday in the Country

09:00a
Industry on Parade

09:15a
Americans at Work

09:30a
This is the Life

10:00a
Insight

10:30a
Faith for Today

11:00a
Pix on Six

11:30a
House Detective

Afternoon


12:30p
The Abundant Life

01:00p
Movie Double Feature – “Harbor of Missing”, “Secrets of Monte Carlo”

03:00p
Telesports Digest

03:30p
Die Fledermaus (special)

05:00p
Film Feature – “NORAD”

05:30p
Highway Patrol

Evening


06:00p
Weather, News (local)

06:20p
Special Report

06:30p
Whiplash

07:00p
The Bullwinkle Show (color)

07:30p
Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color (color)

08:30p
Sir Francis Drake

09:00p
Bonanza (color)

10:00p
The DuPont Show of the Week

11:00p
News (local)

11:15p
Movie – “Jubilee Trail”

01:15a
Weather (local)

Industry on Parade and Americans at Work are two of the programs I wrote about at the beginning, shows that aired on public television in Minneapolis-St. Paul but appear on commercial stations here.  An opera in the afternoon - see what kinds of things you can show when your weekend doesn't consist of wall-to-wall sports?


WISH, Channel 8 (CBS)

Morning


09:00a
Sacred Heart

09:15a
Senator’s Report (Vance Hartke)

09:30a
TV Church

10:00a
Lamp Unto My Feet

10:30a
Look Up and Live

11:00a
Camera Three

11:30a
Brush Strokes of the Masters

Afternoon


12:00p
Accent

12:30p
Indiana University

01:00p
The Big Picture (Army)

01:30p
My Little Margie

02:00p
Film Feature

02:10p
Tribe Topics

02:25p
Minor League Baseball (Louisville vs. Indianapolis)

05:00p
The Invisible Man

05:30p
Original Amateur Hour

Evening


06:00p
The Twentieth Century

06:30p
Mister Ed

07:00p
Lassie

07:30p
Dennis the Menace

08:00p
Ed Sullivan (guests Kate Smith, Wayne and Shuster, Robert Goulet, Jackie Wilson, Marquis Chimps, Rob Murray, Lon Purdy)

09:00p
G.E. Theater

09:30p
Who in the World?

10:00p
Candid Camera

10:30p
What’s My Line? (panelists Joey Bishop, Arlene Francis, Dorothy Kilgallen, Bennett Cerf)

11:00p
CBS Sunday Night News (Eric Sevareid)

11:15p
The Late Show – “Irish Eyes Are Smiling”

The late news on CBS was a standard on Sundays for many years, often delayed to air as one of the last programs of the broadcasting day.  To me, watching it on one of the KELO stations we received when living in The World's Worst Town™, it meant Summer, since that was the only time I stayed up late on what would otherwise be a school night.


WTHI, Channel 10 (Terre Haute) (CBS, ABC, NBC)

Morning


09:00a
Lamp Unto My Feet

09:30a
Look Up and Live

10:00a
Camera Three

10:30a
This is the Life

11:00a
Indiana University

11:30a
Washington Conversation (guest Sen. Karl Mundt)

11:55a
CBS News (Dave Dugan)

Afternoon


12:00p
Film Feature

12:30p
Light Time

12:45p
Baseball (White Sox vs Yankees)

03:45p
Movie – “Two Senoritas from Chicago”

04:30p
Original Amateur Hour

05:00p
The Twentieth Century

05:30p
Mister Ed

Evening


06:00p
Lassie

06:30p
Dennis the Menace

07:00p
Ed Sullivan (guests Kate Smith, Wayne and Shuster, Robert Goulet, Jackie Wilson, Marquis Chimps, Rob Murray, Lon Purdy)

08:00p
G.E. Theater

08:30p
Who in the World?

09:00p
Candid Camera

09:30p
What’s My Line? (panelists Joey Bishop, Arlene Francis, Dorothy Kilgallen, Bennett Cerf)

10:00p
CBS Sunday Night News (Eric Sevareid)

10:15p
News, Weather (local)

10:30p
Follow the Sun

11:30p
News (local)

One of the things I notice about national baseball coverage in the early 60s is that CBS would televise two games during the weekend - Saturday and Sunday - and, presumably to save on transportation costs, it would involve the same two teams.  I suppose that works if you're a fan of the White Sox or Yankees, in this case, but if I didn't have a horse in the race I think I would have preferred a little more variety.


WLW-i, Channel 13 (ABC)

Morning


08:15a
Five Minutes to Live By

08:20a
News, Weather (local)

08:30a
Christopher Program

09:00a
Cadle Tabernacle

09:15a
Christopher Program

09:30a
Indiana University

10:00a
Understanding Our World

10:30a
Church of Christ

10:45a
American Adventure

11:00a
Frontiers of Faith

11:30a
Looking Around

Afternoon


12:00p
Cross Exam

12:30p
Ragtime Era

01:00p
Behind Your Policy

01:15p
Movie – “Random Harvest”

03:30p
Editor’s Choice

04:00p
Issues and Answers

04:30p
Pioneers

05:00p
Wide World of Sports (Japanese All Star Baseball)

Evening


06:30p
Five Fingers

07:30p
Follow the Sun

08:30p
Movie – “Witness for the Prosecution”

10:30p
The Lawman

11:00p
News (local)  

11:15p
Hong Kong

12:15a
Cross Exam

12:45a
News (local)

As I mentioned in Saturday's piece, Witness for the Prosecution is a terrific movie.  As I recall, when it originally played in theaters, there was a disclaimer asking that patrons not reveal the surprise ending to their friends or those waiting to get into the next showing.  Therefore, in case you haven't seen it yet (and why haven't you?), I won't spoil the fun either.


WANE, Channel 15 (Ft. Wayne) (CBS)

Morning


09:00a
Faith for Today

09:30a
This is the Life

10:00a
Lamp Unto My Feet

10:30a
Look Up and Live

11:00a
Camera Three

11:30a
Washington Conversation (guest Sen. Karl Mundt)

11:55a
CBS News (Dave Dugan)

Afternoon


12:00p
TV Playhouse

12:30p
Social Security in Action

12:45p
Baseball (White Sox vs Yankees)

03:30p
Movie – “A Doctor’s Diary”

05:00p
TV Playhouse

05:30p
Original Amateur Hour

Evening


06:00p
The Twentieth Century

06:30p
Mister Ed

07:00p
Lassie

07:30p
Dennis the Menace

08:00p
Ed Sullivan (guests Kate Smith, Wayne and Shuster, Robert Goulet, Jackie Wilson, Marquis Chimps, Rob Murray, Lon Purdy)

09:00p
G.E. Theater

09:30p
Who in the World?

10:00p
Candid Camera

10:30p
What’s My Line? (panelists Joey Bishop, Arlene Francis, Dorothy Kilgallen, Bennet Cerf)

11:00p
CBS Sunday Night News (Eric Sevareid)

11:15p
Movie – “Give Us This Night”

Ted Mack's Original Amateur Hour was a familiar show to me while I was growing up.  Like its stablemate The Twentieth Century or NBC's G.E. College Bowl, it was one of those shows that disappeared once sports took over the weekends.  Now that sports is migrating more and more to cable, do you think they've brought this kind of programming back?  Of course not - now it's infomercials.  And while you're at it, get of my lawn.


WFAM, Channel 18 (Lafayette) (CBS)

Afternoon


05:30p
Original Amateur Hour

Evening


06:00p
The Twentieth Century

06:30p
Mister Ed

07:00p
Bonanza

08:00p
Ed Sullivan (guests Kate Smith, Wayne and Shuster, Robert Goulet, Jackie Wilson, Marquis Chimps, Rob Murray, Lon Purdy)

09:00p
G.E. Theater

09:30p
Who in the World?

10:00p
Candid Camera

10:30p
What’s My Line? (panelists Joey Bishop, Arlene Francis, Dorothy Kilgallen, Bennett Cerf)

11:00p
CBS Sunday Night News (Eric Sevareid)

A joke that kids might have told:  Q: What's blue and publishes books?  A:  Bennett Smurf.

If you don't get that, email me.


WPTA, Channel 21 (Ft. Wayne) (ABC)

Morning


11:00a
Herald of Truth

11:30a
Tour Via Wings

Afternoon


12:00p
Indiana University

12:30p
Assembly of God

01:00p
Story

01:30p
Oral Roberts

02:00p
Your Neighbor: the World

02:30p
Film Feature

03:00p
Film Feature

03:30p
Editor’s Choice

04:00p
Issues and Answers

04:30p
The Big Picture (Army)

05:00p
Wide World of Sports (Japanese All Star Baseball)

Evening


06:30p
Jalopy Races

07:30p
Follow the Sun

08:30p
Movie – “Witness for the Prosecution”

10:30p
The Lawman

11:00p
Movie – “Mother Wore Tights”

I just went back to the issue to make sure I'd gotten the name of the 1pm show correct.  And indeed I have - Story.  How generic is that?  If color television had been around back then, I'll be their graphics would have been in black and yellow.


WKJG, Channel 33 (Ft. Wayne) (NBC)

Morning


09:00a
Sacred Heart

09:30a
Americans at Work

09:45a
Man to Man

10:00a
For Your Information

10:15a
Industry on Parade

10:30a
This is the Life

11:00a
Cartoon Time

11:30a
I Believe (special)

Afternoon


12:00p
Airman’s World

12: 15p
British Calendar

12:30p
Baseball (Twins vs. Indians)

03:00p
Adventure Parade

04:00p
Movie – “Man Trailor”

05:00p
Balance of Fear

05:30p
Patterns in Music (color)

Evening


06:00p
Meet the Press (color)

06:30p
This is NBC News

07:00p
The Bullwinkle Show (color)

07:30p
Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color (color)

08:30p
Sir Francis Drake

09:00p
Bonanza (color)

10:00p
The DuPont Show of the Week

11:00p
News, Weather, Sports (local)

11:15p
Movie – “Banjo on My Knee”

In addition to Americans at Work and Industry on Parade, Channel 33 also has British Calendar, another educational television staple.  I wonder what those shows were like?  I'll have to check YouTube sometime and see if I can find out.


WLBC, Channel 49 (Muncie) (NBC, CBS, ABC)

Afternoon


12:00p
Faith for Today

12:30p
Bible Answers

01:00p
Sacred Heart

01:15p
Industry on Parade

01:30p
This is the Answer

02:00p
This is the Life

02:30p
To Be Announced

03:30p
Editor’s Choice

04:00p
Issues and Answers

04:30p
Championship Bowling

Evening


06:00p
The Twentieth Century

06:30p
Film Feature

07:00p
The Bullwinkle Show (color)

07:30p
Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color (color)

08:30p
Sir Francis Drake

09:00p
Bonanza (color)

10:00p
The DuPont Show of the Week

11:00p
News (local)

11:15p
Country Style, U.S.A.

I always forget how long Issues and Answers was on the air.  Meet the Press was, of course, the granddaddy of them all, but I&A, which eventually morphed into This Week with David Brinkley, was on a long time.

1 comment:

  1. Random observations (because I don't have this issue):

    - CBS's weekend baseball games:
    Remember that network baseball was blacked out of Major League cities, so as not to compete with local team telecasts, such as they were (outside of New York, Chicago, and a couple of other cities, there weren't that many of those).
    Also remember, this was when CBS's ballgames featured Dizzy Dean at the mike.
    If you didn't have a rooting interest in the teams involved, you watched to hear Ol' Diz mangling the King's English and selling Falstaff beer.

    - ABC started Issues And Answers late in 1960, just after John Daly quit the network.
    Up to that point, Daly had been ABC News, going back to radio days; he was the nightly anchorman, but also ran a bare-bones news operation: few correspondents, but a number of name commentators for conventions and elections.
    When Daly quit, ABC decided to get serious about news, hiring Elmer Lower away from CBS and charging him with building an operation from the ground up. This meant hiring reporters and film crews (mainly away from other networks) and that took time.
    Lower bought time by using ABC's sole journalistic asset at that time, the commentators - thus Issues And Answers.
    ABC's long catch-up to the bigger nets took many years, but this is how it started.

    - Story(?):
    This is just a guess: this show might have been Favorite Story, a Ziv syndie series from the '50s.
    It was sort of like Science Fiction Theatre only without the science fiction (the format and presentation were identical).
    Favorite Story's host-narrator was Adolphe Menjou, whose movie career had faded, along with his wardrobe.
    This was my introduction, at an early age, to the wonders of foreign pronunciations: hearing Menjou (a native of Pittsburgh, PA) identify himself as ah-dolf mon-zhew threw the six-year old me at first, fortunately I learned fast.
    (Side note: Issues And Answers's long-time announcer was an ABC staffer named John Causier (kaw-see-ay). Thus a lifelong curiosity is born.)

    - I suppose I ought to go back and put this at the older post, but I'm lazy.
    Your casual reference to Ellery Queen "farming out (the books) to ghostwriters" is something I snag on when people who don't know the whole story try to sound like experts.
    Very briefly:
    The EQ stories (the ones with Ellery as a character) were always plotted out by Frederic Dannay and converted to prose by Manfred Lee.
    Sometime around 1960, Lee developed a writer's block and was unable to fill his role in the collaboration. Dannay was still doing the plotting, but other writers (notably Theodore Sturgeon and Avram Davidson) were brought in to finish the books.
    Since Dannay was still participating, I think that "ghostwriting" isn't an accurate description of the result.
    On the other hand ...
    There were those original paperbacks with the EQ byline (in which Ellery did not appear); these were supervised and edited by Manny Lee, as an effort to keep the Queen brand going (as Fred Dannay was doing with the mystery magazine).
    These paperback originals were "ghostwriting" of a sort (Dannay took no part in their writing). The books themselves, by competent pros who'd contributed short stories to EQMM, are variable, some better than others, but they filled a function.
    All of the above was probably the worst-kept secret in the mystery field, at least among professionals in the field.
    The foregoing is a major compression of a far more complicated story, which I have cribbed from the work of Francis M. Nevins, the leading expert in all matters EQ.
    So there too.

    ReplyDelete

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