December 28, 2015

What's on TV? January 1, 1965

It's the first day of 1965! Happy New Year! After a disappointing New Year's Eve with no shows dedicated to ringing in the new year (as we wrote about Saturday), there are plenty of festivities to go around today. Let's get right to it; the listings continue to be from the Twin Cities.




KTCA, Channel 2 (Educ.)

Afternoon

05:30p
Kindergarten

Evening


06:00p
Antiques

06:30p
St. Olaf College Choir

07:00p
Inquiry

07:30p
Irish Diary

08:00p
Rails West

08:30p
College of St. Thomas

09:00p
Television College

10:00p
Congress of Strings

As befits an educational station, Channel 2 does not broadcast during the daytime while schools are on the Christmas break, as it was so quaintly called back in the day.


WCCO, Channel 4 (CBS)

Morning

07:00a
Clancy and Axel

08:00a
Captain Kangaroo

09:00a
News (Dean Montgomery)

09:15a
What’s New?

09:25a
Dr. Reuben K. Youngdahl

09:30a
Cotton Bowl Parade (hosts Allen Ludden and Marilyn Van Derbur) (special)

10:30a
Rose Parade (hosts Bess Myerson, Ronald Reagan) (special) (color)

Afternoon

12:45p
Cotton Bowl (Nebraska vs. Arkansas) (special)

04:00p
News (Dean Montgomery)

04:15p
Something Special

04:25p
Weather (Bud Kraehling)

04:30p
Axel and Deputy Dawg

05:00p
Clancy and Company

05:30p
CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite

Evening


06:00p
News (Dave Moore)

06:15p
Sports (Don King)

06:20p
Direction

06:25p
Weather (Don O’Brien)

06:30p
Rawhide

07:30p
Nuthouse (special)

08:30p
Gomer Pyle, USMC

09:00p
Slattery’s People

10:00p
News (Dave Moore)

10:15p
Weather (Bud Kraehling)

10:20p
Sports (Hal Scott)

10:30p
Movie – “Avenger of Venice”

12:00a
Sports (Hal Scott)

12:05a
Movie – “Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter”

The Cotton Bowl parade was held at Fair Park in Dallas, home of the Cotton Bowl stadium. When the Cotton Bowl game moved to NBC some years ago, the network indicated it had no interest in televising the parade. Without TV, the parade went away. We now have a Christmas parade in downtown Dallas (and may have had it even when the Cotton Bowl parade was around), but it isn't the same thing.


KSTP, Channel 5 (NBC)

Morning

06:30a
City and Country

07:00a
Today (guests the Swingle Singers)

09:00a
Make Room for Daddy

09:30a
What’s This Song? (guests Fess Parker, Vera Miles) (color)

09:55a
NBC News (Edwin Newman)

10:00a
Orange Bowl Parade (host Dennis Weaver) (special) (color)

10:30a
Rose Parade (hosts Lorne Greene, Betty White) (special) (color)

Afternoon

12:45p
Sugar Bowl (Syracuse vs. LSU) (special) (color)

03:30p
Rose Bowl (Michigan vs. Oregon State)

Evening


06:45p
Orange Bowl (Alabama vs. Texas) (special) (color)

09:30p
1964 Sports Roundup (time approximate) (special)

10:00p
News (John  MacDougall) (color)

10:15p
Weather (Johnny Morris) (color)

10:20p
Sports (Al Tighe) (color)

10:30p
The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (color)

12:15a
Movie – “The Mummy’s Ghost”

The KSTP schedule is so short, it looks like KTCA, doesn't it? This was the first year of what someone once referred to as the football widow's nightmare, with NBC mounting a tripleheader of the Sugar, Rose and Orange Bowls. The Orange Bowl had previously resided on ABC, back when it was an afternoon game that played at the same time as the Sugar and Rose; I suspect NBC might have had something to do with persuading the Orange Bowl Committee to move the game to prime time. I loved this lineup, and rarely checked out the Cotton Bowl during those days. When ABC picked up the Sugar Bowl for 1970, it didn't feel right. Even though ABC televised regular season games, it just wasn't the same. Now that it's on ESPN, it really doesn't feel the same.

Lorne Greene and Betty White teamed up for many a parade on NBC; I think they did the Macy's Thanksgiving Parade for a number of years as well. 


KMSP, Channel 9 (ABC)

Morning

07:45a
Breakfast with Grandpa Ken

08:30a
Romper Room (Miss Betty)

09:30a
The Roaring 20’s

10:30a
The Price is Right

11:00a
Mummers Parade (hosts Les Crane, Kathy Nolan) (special) (color)

Afternoon

12:30p
Lois Leppart

01:00p
Flame in the Wind

01:30p
Day in Court

01:55p
ABC News (Marlene Sanders)

02:00p
General Hospital

02:30p
Young Marrieds

03:00p
Trailmaster

04:00p
Maverick

05:00p
ABC Evening Report (Ron Cochran)

05:15p
News and Weather (local)

05:30p
Leave it to Beaver

Evening


06:00p
Woody Woodpecker

06:30p
The Flintstones (color)

07:00p
The Farmer’s Daughter

07:30p
The Addams Family

08:00p
Valentine’s Day

08:30p
12 O’Clock High

09:30p
Death Valley Days (color)

10:00p
News (Bill Fahan)

10:15p
Weather (Jerry Smith)

10:20p
Sports (Tony Parker)

10:30p
Movie – “Stars and Stripes Forever”

The Mummers parade is very, very strange. I've seen it a few times; it never became a regular feature on network TV, although it was on ABC off and on for awhile. Up against the Rose Parade, I don't think it ever had a chance.


WTCN, Channel 11 (Ind.)

Morning

10:00a
News (local)

10:15a
Hank Meadows

10:30a
Movie – “The Boy With Green Hair”

11:55a
News (Dick Ford)

Afternoon

12:00p
Lunch With Casey

12:45p
The King and Odie

01:00p
Movie – “Jack and the Beanstalk”

03:00p
Bachelor Father

03:30p
Dave Lee and Pete

04:30p
Superman

05:00p
Magilla Gorilla

05:30p
Casey and Roundhouse

05:45p
Rocky and His Friends

Evening


06:00p
The Rifleman

06:30p
Bold Journey

07:00p
Adventure Theater

07:30p
Movie – “David and Goliath”

09:30p
News (Dick Ford)

09:45p
Weather (Stuart A. Lindman)

09:50p
Sports (Buetel/Horner)

10:00p
Wanted – Dead or Alive

10:30p
Movie – “Safari”

12:30a
Amos ‘n’ Andy

WTCN's choice of Jack and the Beanstalk tells me that it's still the holiday season - kids are still out of school, decorations are still up and shining. It's a regular lineup for Channel 11; no special movies, no marathons, nothing that would be commonplace today.

17 comments:

  1. I wonder if anyone's ever made a study on which is a bigger bore: football or parades.
    In my experience, football games are interesting only to the extent of the bet you've got down on the outcome. Since I don't gamble, there's no interest for me.
    Parades don't even have that interest for me.
    In other words, Mitch - wrong day.

    If you'd gone for Thursday instead - that would have been a different story.
    I was on winter break from high school; game shows were my thing back then.
    That week, among others, Jayne Mansfield and Orson Bean, who often teamed up on Broadway, were doing Password; this would have been about the time of Mariska Hargitay's birth (and how old does that make me feel).
    In the evening, one of the best later Perry Mason cases, "TCO the Ruinous Road"; worth looking up (great twist at the end, and note how often in later shows Mason and Burger work together to solve the cases).

    Truth to tell, this whole week is kinda blah anyway.

    That said, I'll hark back to the previous post, and its passing mention of Katherine Crawford.
    Do you ever check back on when you get mentioned on other blogs?
    You came up on Mystery File a bit back in connection with Ms. Crawford.
    A late '70s series called Gemini Man, in which Ms. Crawford had a supporting role, brought forth a number of comments, including one fro someone calling himself "Bill", who delivered his notion that Katherine Crawford got her professional name from Katharine Hepburn and Joan Crawford (see: 'wannabe').
    Someone quoted your posting about a TV GUIDE profile of Ms. Crawford, mentioning her father, Roy Huggins, but this caused "Bill" to stand his ground, maintaining that his version was correct.
    At this point I chimed in with the information that Katherine Huggins had used her own first name (Katherine), combined with her paternal grandmother's maiden name (Crawford); I even provided sourcing (a biography of Roy Huggins).
    "Bill's" response was to dig in harder, in a manner I can only describe as personally insulting; "he'd" made a discovery, I was taking it away ... ugly, just ugly.
    You can see this for yourself, if you're sufficiently masochistic: just go to Mystery File and search for Gemini Man.

    And a Happy New Year to you too.





    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You know, one of my problems is that I can never tell when I've been mentioned somewhere else. (I'm glad you brought that up; I'm actually planning to mention it in the State of the Blog on Friday.) For some reason the trackbacks on the blog have never worked, so I'm never pinged when someone links to a story at another site. Every once in a while I do a Google search to see if "It's About TV" comes up, but it's very unreliable. If you - or anyone else - would like to dive into this and see if you can help me rectify it, because I love the interaction and would like to do it more often, please let me know either through the comments or via email.

      And I do have to admit that I've always enjoyed the parades - when I was a wee lad, I used to set the alarm to make sure I was up in time to watch the Thanksgiving Day parades on CBS when they'd cover Philly, Detroit, New York and Toronto (and later Hawaii). We'll turn over to Hallmark on Friday (the only time we'll do so this year) to watch Bob Eubanks and Stephanie Edwards (two old TV hands) do the commercial-free coverage of the Rose Parade.

      I love the history of bowl games, probably more than the contemporary games themselves. I have a modest collection of games from years past (on disc, combined with YouTube), and in years when the games have been particularly uninspiring I've been known to watch old Sugar, Rose and Orange Bowls from the late '60s or early '70s. (Once, I was able to watch all three from the same year.) I may do that this year; I tend to tone down my more eccentric behavior when we have company, and this year we're on our own, so I control the remote. But I do share your disdain for the commercial side of the game, which I think is one reason why I find the older games so appealing. Watching Oklahoma and Tennessee from the 1968 Orange Bowl or Stanford and Michigan in the 1972 Rose Bowl, is enormously fun, from the designs they used on the field to finding how well I recalled the games from when I saw them live in the day. I try hard not to get angry about how the game has changed since then.

      In a later comment you mentioned Australian Rules Football, and I think your description is spot on. Now that's a game I really get into, though I was dismayed to see my Geelong Cats fall short once again.

      Delete
  2. Hey I think it's a great day to post Mitch. What on earth is "Nuthouse" on Ch.4? Why does ABC not broadcast any bowl games even though it has sole rights to regular season games? (That would end due to antitrust rulings in 1983.) And why are the parades as numerous as the football games? Let's not forget there were a lot less bowl games in the 60s, and Notre Dame famously didn't accept any bowl invites at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Nuthouse was a special that CBS ordered up from Jay Ward and Bill Scott of Rocky And Bullwinkle fame.
      Essentially, it was Laugh-In before Laugh-In.
      It aired the previous September, but CBS didn't pick it up for a series; running it again on New Year's Eve possibly meant that the network was still considering it, but no go.
      By the way, New Year's Eve was when the network ran it; Channel 4 delayed it one day to preempt Password and Baileys Of Balboa - so what did they show on Thursday night at 8?

      Delete
    2. Notre Dame would begin accepting bowl invites in 1969.

      Delete
    3. Thanks, Al! And a great description down further.

      Mike - on Thursday at 8 Channel 4 had Password, followed by Baileys of Balboa at 8:30.

      Tom - I know the official story was that Notre Dame was able to adjust their schedule for semester finals so that it would no longer interfere with the schedule the football team would have to keep if they were in a bowl. Don't you think this was possible in part because Ara convinced the administration that since the AP had decided to do their final poll after the bowls, Notre Dame would never be able to consistently challenge for the championship if they continued to refuse to go to bowls?

      Delete
    4. Late Sudden Recollection:

      That winter saw CBS's primetime schedule in flux:
      Password and Baileys Of Balboa were on Thursday night, and the regular Friday slot had The Entertainers,
      the short-lived Carol Burnett/Bob Newhart hour.
      As memory now serves, Entertainers was dropped around this time; the original plan was to move Password and Baileys to Friday, with Rudy Vallee's variety hour from the previous summer getting the Thursday hour. Nuthouse, the repeat special, was placeholding that week.
      At the last minute, CBS decided against the switch, leaving Password and Baileys on Thursday and keeping Friday as a variety hour.
      TV Guide's local program pages always had a closer print deadline than the color section; this apparently varied from city to city.
      Minn-StPaul had a closer deadline than did Chicago, so they had the switchback while we didn't.
      My family was watching ch7-ABC that night, mainly for 12-O'clock High (my dad's favorite show then).
      So there too.

      Delete
  3. As I'm a foreigner to US television someone might need to explain to me about all the "bowls" and parades?? So many of them... and then there's actually an "Orange Bowl Parade" just to combine the two together??!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trying to explain the sporting customs of one nation to another would require volumes.
      In this case, trying to explain the importance of college football, which at this point of history far outstripped that of the professional game, would probably take at least a university course.
      I mentioned above that I had no interest in football, either pro or college; this is one of the major reasons why.

      Years ago, when Channel 32 was carrying Don Lane's show, I remember his description of Australian Rules Football:
      "... it's a combination of gridiron, basketball, kung fu, and the St. Valentine's Day Massacre."
      That, as a Yank, was all I needed to know, really ...

      Happy New Year to the Land Down Under (from the Land Up Over).

      Delete
    2. OK here it goes...
      Way back when, tourism groups in warm weather cities starting setting up winter festivals. They quickly realized a great way to get people to these festivals was setting up exhibition games between top college football teams after their season was over. (Until very recently, there were no playoffs in big time college football.) These exhibitions (aka "bowls") became such big business that seemingly every locality wanted one; indeed they've become so big that a lot of them aren't linked to any festival, but are organized by corporate sponsors wanting an ad opportunity.

      Delete
    3. That's a very good summary, Al. Excellent description of how the games started! And you could add that until the mid '60s, so much so were the games considered exhibitions that they weren't used to determine the final rankings. Now, of course, it would be unthinkable to suggest that the bowl games didn't count.

      Delete
    4. One thing I'd add to the original question - I think that the Rose Parade was probably the one parade among all these that was most firmly established many years before the football game was added. I know for sure that the late Cotton Bowl Parade came many years after the game was started; I believe there is still a Sugar Bowl Parade and the Orange Bowl festival, but because it preceded the bowl game, the "Tournament of Roses Parade" has never been known as the Rose Bowl Parade. I forgot sometimes just how foreign our culture looks to others!

      Delete
    5. Just as we've been talking about this... I noticed on the TV guide that at 12.30am on New Year's Day (just after the fireworks had finished) on one of the networks we were to get The 126th Rose Parade, which I'm guessing was from the year before. I don't recall if the Rose Parade had ever been aired in Australia before but it's bizarre that just as we talk about it I see it listed in the guide.

      Happy New Year :)

      Delete
  4. You listed the Rose Bowl as being in black-and-white, and the Orange Bowl in color. Wasn't it the other way around in 1965, with both being in color starting in 1966?

    ReplyDelete
  5. James T. Aubrey, CBS' ruthless president, made it clear "THE NUT HOUSE" would NEVER become a weekly series on HIS network, because one of his associates, Hunt Stromberg, Jr. loathed Jay Ward.....and Aubrey felt the same way. He didn't want any offbeat "zany" comedy shows on his schedule. He wanted "the same old shit", week after week, year after year. And if that meant more sitcoms like "THE BEVERLY HILLBILLIES" and "MISTER ED".....so be it.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Besides, Aubrey was committed to two sitcoms produced by his "old buddy", Keefe Brasselle- "THE BAILEYS OF BALBOA" and "THE CARA WILLIAMS SHOW". The third series produced by Brasselle's "Richelieu Productions", "THE REPORTER", had already been axed.....and the other two were in ratings trouble. And then CBS began to investigate WHY Aubrey committed the network to those series WITHOUT formal pilot films {including Jack Chertok's "MY LIVING DOLL"}. That eventually led to Aubrey being removed as CBS' president that February. And those programs? They were all cancelled by the end of the season, and Keefe Brasselle never produced another TV show again.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The Mummers Parade getting some early network clearance on ABC probably had something to do with Well, let's try it (ABC having to do a lot of that in its early decades) and also that WPVI, the ABC affiliate in Philadelphia, had arguably undue sway with the network...perhaps not least because it was the station belonging to the Annenbergs, also the owners of TV GUIDE and its Triangle Publications. Among other things.

    ReplyDelete

Keep those cards and letters coming in!