July 8, 2016

Around the Dial

It's a bad, bad morning here in Dallas - I'm guessing, perhaps, the blackest since the JFK assassination - and nothing that I or anyone else can write today is going to change that. In the face of that, television is, of course, a trivial matter;* in a sense that's good, because it returns us to our roots, if for only a time. Television is, should be, entertainment, and if every once in a while it can help us escape the cares and troubles out there, even if it's only temporary, that's a good thing. And there are still pieces out there that can bring one pleasure, so we'll go forth and look for some of the best.

*Whether or not television has played a role in this increasing climate of violence, and if so to what extent, is for another day, but an interesting topic nonetheless.

Joanna at Christmas TV History has started her annual "Christmas in July" postings, this year providing Christmas memories from other bloggers. Yours truly will be appearing later in the month, but in the meantime please go over to Joanna's site daily and check out these wonderful pieces!

The Hitchcock Project continues at bare-bones e-zine with a look at the fourth season episode "Invitation to an Accident," one of those I haven't seen yet. I'm working my way through Season Four now (well, not right now) so it should be coming up soon.

If life's getting you down - and after this week who could blame you - David at Comfort TV tells one and all how to have a groovy classic TV summer. Right now I think we need it.

One of the reasons I tend to like British police shows  (as opposed, for example, to amateur sleuthing mysteries) is because the grittiness is combined with an elegance, a sense of the world that I often find missing in American counterparts. Injustice, the latest at British TV Detectives, is another grim piece from the creator of the great Foyle's War.

The Horn Section is back with another Maverick Monday, returning to the episode "Prey of the Cat" with Jack Kelly as Bart. It's a rare Maverick episode, written specifically for the program (i.e. not recycled from another Western) that substitutes a tense suspense drama for the series' trademark humor.

Lincoln X-ray Ida is in a reminiscing mood as well, with the Adam-12 episode "Million Dollar Buff." Despite its light-hearted moments, it reminds us (as if we needed it) that police work is dangerous business. As for Martin Millner's character checking out an attractive blonde at the beginning of the episode, what does he think this is - Route 66?

As you know, I've been nursing a grudge against the BBC since their sacking of Jeremy Clarkson as host of Top Gear. This week we learned that Chris Evans, the revamped show's new host, has already left the ratings-challenged program after one season; we also get a chance to read about what a jerk Evans is. I wonder if the suits at the BBC are asking themselves in retrospect whether or not Clarkson was really that bad after all?

That's it until tomorrow - see you back here then. As Dave Garroway would say, "Peace."

3 comments:

  1. My thought and my prayers are with the Dallas Police Department and the families of the slain officers, and also to Police Officer Mike Flamion of the St. Louis suburb of Ballwin, MO, along with the officers shot in Baton Rouge, LA and in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota. Personally, I have a nephew who is also a police officer in the St. Louis area. Please be careful, Christopher. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete

And now for something completely different.